SOFTWARE

LNP Dome Theater Compendium

A comprehensive directory of the world's planetarium and digital dome theaters!

Since 1977, Loch Ness Productions has amassed what is probably the world's foremost accumulation of data about the planetarium and digital dome theater community. We currently maintain information on some 3,900 theaters — about half in the United States, and another 2,000 or so in other countries.

All this information, and much more, is available to you — in the LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM. Check out the PREVIEWS! links below to see how it works.

It's a collection of HTML files and several subfolders of small graphics, suitable for viewing in any modern frames-capable, CSS-compliant Web browser. There are no programs to install; you simply point your Web browser to the cover page, and it takes over from there. It features three index columns — Locations, People, and Projectors — as well as our popular statistics summaries.

We currently make the LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM available in two different "packages":


PREVIEW!

LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM BROWSER

The LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM BROWSER is our compilation of both classic and fulldome theaters. There are more than 3,900 entries. The files require less than 10 MB of disk space; we've gathered them into a small (~2 MB) zip archive for easy transmission as an e-mail attachment.




PREVIEW!
LNP FULLDOME THEATER COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION

The LNP FULLDOME THEATER COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION focuses on fulldome theaters only. There are more than 1,100 entries. The files require less than 10 MB of disk space; we've gathered them into a small (~2 MB) zip archive for easy downloading.

In addition to the Browser, it includes a space-filled, fixed-length-record database file in DBF form, as well as a Excel XLS spreadsheet. There is one entry (record, spreadsheet row) per fulldome projector system. Only theater information is included in these databases, not personal names and email addresses.

Here's how the subscription part works: When we run the program that updates our online Web listings, we generate a new version of the database file, and it gets uploaded along with the public online updates. This happens, on average, every 3-4 weeks or so. We provide you with a private URL, valid for a calendar year's worth of downloads. You can grab a current database file whenever you want. At the start of the new year, we change the name/URL of the zip file, and send an e-mail asking if you want to renew the subscription. If so, you get the new URL and are good to go for another year.


Isn't there a printed book version of the Compendium?

There once was, but it has been discontinued. The last edition was printed in November 2002.

How often is the LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM updated?

During the normal everyday course of doing business at Loch Ness Productions, we're continually making changes and updates to our database. When we receive an order for the Compendium, we will usually generate an entire new set of Compendium pages at that time! So the data will always be current, to the best of our knowledge, often to within a matter of minutes.

We've priced the Compendium so reasonably low that you'll be tempted to order frequent updates. In the left corner of the index page is the creation date, to help you decide when it's time.

Can I get the data electronically, like a spreadsheet?

SHORT ANSWER #1: If you're interested in only fulldome theaters, yes. Our FULLDOME THEATER COMPENDIUM SUBSCRIPTION may suit your needs.

SHORT ANSWER #2: Some of the data is available, but not in the same form the Compendium uses. dBASE-compatible DBF files for mailing purposes are $150 US, $190 International. To order, contact us.

LONG ANSWER: The LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM does not exist as a single spreadsheet or database. It is a compilation of data from different sources.

We use the relational database program dBASE III+ (yes, a DOS program). The address information is in one database, projector equipment in a second, people in a third, the text blocks and URLs in yet more databases. Each database is indexed, and records are linked using unique locater codes. This allows us to link indefinite numbers of records — such as attaching multi-person staffs to single institutions or multiple projectors to single domes, for example — without the overhead of duplicated data in each.

When people ask for our publication in electronic form, what they usually want is either 1) a mailing list so they can pitch some product or service to the planetarium or planetarian, or 2) a data set from which marketing analyses can be run for commercial or research intent. We do make available a subset of the information in our databases to parties we perceive as beneficial to the planetarium community — sometimes even our competition.

We can make available the "address block" in database form. Scroll down for details about which items are included. For those wanting information extending beyond what's needed for mailings, you'll have to contact us about doing custom database programming for you.

We maintain approximately 1,500 U.S. and 1,900 international theater entries. We charge $150 for the U.S. mailing list and $190 for the international mailing list. That works out to about US$0.10/entry. We do no advance culling — you get all the entries.

dBASE III+ files are space-filled, not delimited, databases. Most database and spreadsheet programs can import .DBF format files. The structure of each record is detailed below. We store the files into zip archives for transmission as an e-mail attachment. U.S. and International combined are usually less than 200K zipped; they expand to approximately 450K each when unzipped.

Structure for dBASE III+ databases:

Field  Field Name  Type       Width    Dec
    1  PLT_NAME    Character     30
    2  INST_NAME   Character     30
    3  ADDRESS     Character     30
    4  CITY        Character     20
    5  ST_PROV     Character     17
    6  COUNTRY     Character     30
    7  POSTALCODE  Character     10
    8  PHONE       Character     19
    9  PHONDESC    Character     10
   10  PHONE2      Character     19
   11  PHONDESC2   Character     10
   12  PHONE3      Character     19
   13  PHONDESC3   Character     10
   14  EMAILBOX    Character     60
   15  PLT_CLASS   Character     15
   16  GIFTSHOP    Character      8
   17  PUB_SHOWS   Character     12
   18  DOME        Character      4
   19  TILT        Character      2
   20  CAPACITY    Character      3
   21  SEATING     Character     14
   22  ANN_ATTEND  Character      7
   23  AT_RPT_RCD  Character      4
   24  DOMEMAKER   Character     30
   25  DOMEMODEL   Character     30
   26  DOMEINST    Character      4
   27  PROJMAKER   Character     30
   28  PROJMODEL   Character     30
   29  PROJINST    Character      4
   30  VIDEODESC   Character     40
   31  SOFTWARE    Character     40
   32  STEREO3D    Character      1

Are the addresses CASS-certified?

No. We know about the USPS CASS-certification guidelines for conforming mailing addresses, but have chosen not to format our data in that manner. We think "123 Second Circle Street, Suite A" looks a lot better in our Compendium than "123 2D CR ST STE A". At Loch Ness Productions, we usually send our mailings first class anyway, so we don't use pre-sort discounts, bulk rates and such.

What's the difference between the LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM and what's listed online?

The LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM is the biggie, the full Monty, the complete listing of all the theaters worldwide. It's a commercial product. There are more than 3900 listings. It features three index columns (Locations, People, and Projectors); the online listings provide only one, Locations.

The LNP DOME THEATER COMPENDIUM ONLINE! is a subset — only those classic theaters who have licensed Loch Ness Productions shows, or have submitted update forms. There are more than 300 listings.

The LNP FULLDOME THEATER COMPENDIUM ONLINE! is also a subset — only those theaters with fulldome video capability. There are more than 1100 listings.

The latter two include information about Loch Ness Productions shows that theaters have licensed; the commercial products do not.